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Event Report
No.045
Final Event at Tokyo Wonder Site Shibuya

Tokyo Wonder Site Shibuya had been promoting the latest new things in art culture in Shibuya for 12 or so years. In September 2017, it closed its doors in order to transform into Tokyo Shibuya Koen-dori Gallery. The closing event was held on September 17th, the last day of an exhibition, and was attended by many visitors.

Han Ishu, <em>Hanshutsu</em>

Han Ishu, Hanshutsu

Performances of the closing night leaves an afterglow for the future

Tokyo Wonder Site Shibuya (hereafter TWS Shibuya) opened in 2005, and over the following 12 years, held over 200 exhibitions and events while discovering new talents and generating many experimental creations.

The closing event was attended by around 130 individuals, including artists and regular customers, who had close ties to the gallery. Performance pieces were put on by three groups of artists.

Nao Nishihara presented a performance of sounds and music. He began on stage by discussing an installation piece he had created entitled Oto no Seikatsu (“everyday life of sounds”), and played musical instruments from around the world.

Han Ishu did a performance piece, Hanshutsu (“load out”), in which he “packaged” himself and loaded himself out. A cardboard box containing the artist spent about an hour making its way toward the exit, allowing the viewers to observe the act of “loading out,” the final step in the work that is carried out when holding an exhibition.

Members of artist group Oruta and Seoul-based project group Kaihou Kairo performed Pang Pang ν(nu), a piece inspired by festivals, folk songs, and customs of Japan and South Korea.

Activities held in Shibuya in the past will go on to connect and lead to other activities and artwork. The closing night seemed to be suggestive of such a future. Look forward to seeing new work produced by up-and-coming creators and artists at two sites—Tokyo Arts and Space (TOKAS) Hongo, and TOKAS Residency.

The ending of Nao Nishihara’s performance left an impression that there would be more to come.

The ending of Nao Nishihara’s performance left an impression that there would be more to come.

<em>Hanshutsu</em> by Han Ishu. Video of the “<em>hanshutsu</em>” (load out) from the gallery space to the hallway is being shown in the hallway.

<em>Hanshutsu</em> by Han Ishu. Video of the “<em>hanshutsu</em>” (load out) from the gallery space to the hallway is being shown in the hallway.

Hanshutsu by Han Ishu. Video of the “hanshutsu” (load out) from the gallery space to the hallway is being shown in the hallway.

<em>Densho Pang Pang ν(nu)</em> by OLTA+OPEN CIRCUIT
Eight young individuals encircle a table and begin a feast, dancing to folk songs and holding rituals.

One of the cups passed out during the OLTA+OPEN CIRCUIT performance of <em>Densho Pang Pang ν(nu)</em>.

Left: Densho Pang Pang ν(nu) by OLTA+OPEN CIRCUIT
Eight young individuals encircle a table and begin a feast, dancing to folk songs and holding rituals.
Right: One of the cups passed out during the OLTA+OPEN CIRCUIT performance of Densho Pang Pang ν(nu).

At the end, a group photo was taken of all the participating artists and visitors.

At the end, a group photo was taken of all the participating artists and visitors.

Text: Emi Sato
Photo: Shu Nakagawa

Tokyo Arts and Space (TOKAS) Launched!

Tokyo Wonder Site changed its name on October 1 to Tokyo Arts and Space (TOKAS) and embarked on a new path. The facility that formerly housed Tokyo Wonder Site has reopened its doors as Tokyo Shibuya Koen-dori Gallery, operated by Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo. This new gallery will hold exhibits, provide a space for interactions, and share various information, focusing on Art Brut and other types of art.
http://www.tokyoartsandspace.jp
http://inclusion-art.jp